Agenda and minutes

Economic Development & Managed Growth Scrutiny Board
Tuesday 5th March 2019 6.00 pm

Venue: Committee Room 1 Civic Suite. View directions

Contact: Democratic Services 

Items
No. Item

41.

Apologies

Minutes:

Present: Councillors: M Parker (Chairman), R Grinsell (Vice Chairman), K Hawkins, K Blunt, M McLoughlin, C Williams, K Allsopp and G Slater (Substitute) 

 

Guests:   Fiona Hughes: Chief Executive, Solihull Community Housing (SCH)

Richard Hyde: Solihull Community Housing (SCH) Board Chairman

 

Officers:  Perry Wardle (Assistant Director, Growth and Development)

George Daley (Strategic Policy Lead, Housing)

Sangeeta Leahy (Public Health)

David Mackins (UK Central Project Manager)

Alison McGrory (Assistant Director, Stronger Communities)

Sarah Rooney Strategic Development Manager, Third Sector)

Mark Collyer (Senior Development Officer, Housing Policy)

Paul Rogers (Democratic Services)

 

The Economic Development and Managed Growth Scrutiny Board meeting commenced at 6:00 p.m.

 

 

1.  APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

 

Apologies for absence were received from Councillor A Adeyemo (Councillor G Slater substituting) and Councillor Ian Courts, CPH Managed Growth (Council business).

42.

Declarations of Pecuniary or Conflicts of Interest

Minutes:

There were no declarations of interest.

43.

Questions and Deputations

Minutes:

No questions or deputations were submitted.

44.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 97 KB

To consider for approval the Minutes arising from the Economic Development and Managed Growth Scrutiny Board meeting held on 17th January 2019.

Minutes:

RESOLVED:

 

The Minutes arising from the Economic Development and Managed Growth Scrutiny Board meeting held on 17th January 2019 be confirmed as a correct record, subject to the following corrections:

 

(i)  (i) Page 8, Paragraph 5 commencing:

 

‘In terms of the draft strategy’s reference to Workplace Travel Plans, the Scrutiny Board agreed that it would prefer to see fewer, effective plans put in place, which could be properly supported….’

 

To be corrected to read as:

 

‘In terms of the draft strategy’s reference to Workplace Travel Plans, the Scrutiny Board agreed that it would prefer to see quality over quantity, which could be properly supported…..’

 

(ii) Page 8, Paragraph 6 commencing:

 

‘Members noted that whilst it was recognised that EV’s were a positive step towards addressing the production of PM’s, they were still capable of producing P.M. 2.5, which would be increased significantly with a switch nationally from petrol/diesel to electric, and that this should be acknowledged within the strategy’.

 

To be deleted.

 

(iii) Page12, Paragraph 2 commencing:

 

‘With specific reference to Birmingham Airport, it was noted that the airport authority had indicated it wanted future provision of wider roads to cater for its projected passenger growth….’

 

To be corrected to read as:

 

With specific reference to the draft Surface Strategy references to modal shift, it was noted that the airport authority had indicated it wanted future provision of wider roads to cater for its projected passenger growth….’

45.

Solihull Community Housing Delivery Plan 2019/20 pdf icon PDF 99 KB

The purpose of the report is to present the draft Solihull Community Housing Delivery Plan 2019/20 for consideration of the Scrutiny Board and for Members to make any recommendations to the Cabinet Member for Environment and Housing.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

 

5.  SOLIHULL COMMUNITY HOUSING (SCH) DELIVERY PLAN 2019-2020

 

The draft Solihull Community Housing Delivery Plan was presented to the Scrutiny Board, with the Board invited to make recommendations to the Cabinet Member for Environment and Housing. 

 

The Strategic Policy Lead (Housing) advised that the SCH Delivery Plan 2019-20 met the Management Agreement requirements in place between SCH and the Council.  The Delivery Plan’s format and presentation reflected SCH’s new branding, which was welcomed by Scrutiny Board Members.

 

The SCH Board Chairman addressed the Scrutiny Board, informing Members that he had been in post for six months.  The SCH Board Chairman’s impressions of the organisation were that it possessed skilled and knowledgeable employees, was delivering a number of positive work streams and that SCH provided tenants with good, affordable housing. The Chairman referenced SCH’s stretch targets and performance indicators for 2019/20 and advised the Scrutiny Board that the organisational objective was to raise performance further.  Member’s attention was drawn to the changing legislative landscape for housing post Grenfell Inquiry and housing regulations in force post ALMO’s, which would be required to be kept under review.

 

Members were informed the SCH property portfolio contained 10,000 properties, but was contracting, which was recognised as a risk in the context of managing future housing demand and housing pressures within the borough. 

 

The SCH Chief Executive delivered a PowerPoint presentation, highlighting key features detailed in the Delivery Plan 2019/20. Members were advised that the SCH Delivery Plan was a requirement of the Management Agreement in place between SCH and the Council.  Key issues highlighted through the presentation to the Scrutiny Board included:

 

SCH Achievements

The SCH Chief Executive highlighted:

 

- The redesign of the Homelessness Service to comply with the requirements of the Homelessness Act, for which thanks were extended to the Council for supplying SCH with additional resource and support to undertake the service redesign.

 

-     Provision of a new, self-funded Well Being Service.

 

-  Delivery of new developments, such as Saxon Court in December 2018.

 

-  Provision of the SCH Asset Management Strategy.

 

-  SCH’s continuing lead partnership role in locality working.

 

-  Continued support of tenants through welfare reforms; and,

 

-  Development and delivery of new SCH branding.

 

Regarding the policy context for social housing, Members were advised that the Government had commissioned inquiries following the Grenfell Tower fire of June 2017, which proved to be a watershed for the management of social housing concerning health and safety, building and fire regulations and management of housing stock in general. SCH continued to ensure compliance with the findings and recommendations arising from the Dame Judith Hackett review.

 

Members were advised that the consultation response to the Social Housing Green Paper A ‘new deal’ for Social Housing (August 2018) addressed:

 

  Provision of safe and decent homes.

 

  Access to good complaints procedures for tenants.

 

  Empowering tenants to express concern.

 

  Addressing social housing stigma; and,

 

  Expanding housing supply / ownership.

 

It was noted that the SCH Delivery Plan 2019/20 had taken  ...  view the full minutes text for item 45.

46.

Kingshurst Town Centre pdf icon PDF 216 KB

As part of the work plan for 2018/2019, the Scrutiny Board requested a report on Kingshurst Village Centre Regeneration focussing on how the programme is building in the future opportunities for all parts of the community to benefit.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

6.  KINGSHURST TOWN CENTRE

 

The UK Central Project Manager provided Members with a PowerPoint presentation.  The principle points highlighted through the presentation are summarised below.

 

Cabinet had identified the requirement to demolish The Parade, Kingshurst. Extensive community consultation had been undertaken regarding the development proposals for Kingshurst centre.  Key findings arising from community engagement demonstrated there was a need to review the proposed red line scheme boundary to determine the extent of land required to deliver a transformational project and, secondly, there was a requirement to review the schemes planned commercial floor space in order to deliver a sustainable offer.  The Kingshurst development site was recognised as a constrained site in its existing form, which had led the Council to consider potentially extending the development site boundary.

 

Existing key challenges were identified as:

 

  Land assembly.

 

  Ensuring the return of existing tenants post development.

 

  Working with local businesses.

 

  Working with local NHS services.

 

  Determining whether a Compulsory Purchase Order was required.

 

To progress the scheme proposals, the Council was in the process of addressing the following:

 

  The pace and scale of change in the retail market sector, especially over the past two years. The Council recognised that the redevelopment scheme must be transformational for Kingshurst and to support longer term community needs over the foreseeable future.

 

  The extended red line scheme boundary had been identified.

 

  Issues of connectivity (highway and footpath) in Kingshurst centre.

 

It was recognised that Kingshurst required regeneration, but the case for delivering regeneration had to be made to the clear in the Panning Brief.  The planning consultation had been scheduled from 18th February to 18th March 2019.  The Kingshurst Planning Brief identified key components included:

 

  Healthy Living: Is viewed as a Unique Selling Point of the scheme proposals and recognised to be a local priority.

 

  Provision of an anchor store, supported by a further six retail units.

 

  Provision of a commercial centre located in the north of the site between the Church and Primary School.

 

  New residential development

 

Members were advised three key options for future site development were currently under consideration:

 

  Option 1- Marston Drive: To use the existing road lay out for Marston Drive was viewed as the most deliverable option, but would not provide the transformational change sought for Kingshurst centre.  New retail units would be located on Marston Drive. However, access to the park would be effected and, nor would any linkage to the Church or school be provided in the north-east quarter of the site.

 

  Option 2- Linking Church Close to Colling Walk: This option would support the establishment of a high street on the site.  A high street could also service the Church and school. Scope would be made available for further improving links to the school.  There was the option available to pedestrianize Marston Drive, with the railings removed from the park area to open up the space further. However, alignment with Church Close and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 46.